INT. WELTON ACADEMY HALLWAY - DAY

A young boy, dressed in a school uniform and cap, fidgets as his mother
adjusts his tie.

				MOTHER
		Now remember, keep your shoulders back.

A student opens up a case and removes a set of bagpipes. The young
boy and his brother line up for a photograph

				PHOTOGRAPHER
		Okay, put your arm around your brother.
		That's it. And breathe in.

The young boy blinks as the flash goes off.

				PHOTOGRAPHR
		Okay, one more.

An old man lights a single candle. A teacher goes over the old
man's duties.

				TEACHER
		Now just to review, you're going to
		follow along the procession until you
		get to the headmaster. At that point
		he will indicate to you to light the
		candles of the boys.

				MAN
		All right boys, let's settle down.

The various boys, including NEIL, KNOX, and CAMERON, line up holding
banners. Ahead of them is the old man, followed by the boy with the
bagpipes with the two youngest boys at the front.

				MAN
		Banners up.

The boys hoist the banners and the bagpipes begin to play loudly. The
small group marches out of the room and down a set of stairs into a
church. The pews are filled with students and parents while the
teachers, all dressed in robes, are seated at the front of the church
behind the headmaster.

The boys break off to either side at the front of the church. The
bagpipes cease and the headmaster, MR. NOLAN, walks over to the old
man carrying the candle.

				MR NOLAN
		Ladies and gentlemen, boys, the light
		of knowledge.

An organ begins to play as the old man goes forward with shaking hands
to the young boys in the front pew. Each boy is holding a candle and
he bends over to light the first one. Each boy in turn lights the
candle of the boy next to him.

				MR NOLAN
		One hundred years ago, in 1859, 41 boys sat in this
		room and were asked the same question that greets
		you at the start of each semester. Gentlemen, what
		are the four pillars?

All throughout the pews, uniformed boys rise to their feet. TODD, who
is not wearing a uniform, is urged by his father to stand with them.

				BOYS
		Tradition, honor, discipline, excellence.

The boys quickly return to their seats.

				MR NOLAN
		In her first year, Welton Academy graduated five
		students. Last year we graduated fifty-one. And
		more than seventy-five percent of those went on to
		the Ivy League. This, this kind of accomplishment is
		the result of fervent dedication to the principles taught
		here. This is why you parents have been sending us
		your sons. This is why we are the best preparatory
		school in the United States.

Mr. Nolan soaks up the applause from the audience.

				MR NOLAN
		As you know, our beloved Mr. Portius of the English
		department retired last term. You will have the
		opportunity later to meet his replacement, Mr. John
		Keating, himself a graduate of this school. And who,
		for the past several years, has been teaching at the
		highly regarded Chester School in London.

The crowd applauds once again.

EXT. SCHOOL GROUNDS - DAY

The school lawn is a filled with luggage, students, and parents mulling
about in every direction.

INT CHURCH ENTRANCE - DAY

Mr Nolan stands by the entrance, speaking with each family as they leave.

				MR NOLAN
		Glad you could come by.

				MR ANDERSON
		Thrilling ceremony as usual Dr. Nolan.

				MR NOLAN
		You've been away too long.

				MRS ANDERSON
		Hello Dr. Nolan.

				MR NOLAN
		Good to have you back.

				MRS ANDERSON
		This is our youngest, Todd.

				MR NOLAN
		Mr. Anderson.You have some big shoes to fill,
		young man. Your brother was one of our finest.

				TODD
		Thank you.

Todd and his parents leave while others file past Mr. Nolan.

				WOMAN
		Lovely ceremony.

				MR NOLAN
		Thank you. So glad you liked it.

MR PERRY approaches with his son Neil. He shakes Mr. Nolan's hand.

				MR PERRY
		Gale

				MR NOLAN
		Tom

				MR PERRY
		Good to see you again.

				NEIL
		Hello Mr. Nolan.

				MR NOLAN
		Neil. We expect great things from you this year.

				NEIL
		Thank you, sir.

				MR PERRY
		Well he won't disappoint us. Right Neil?

				NEIL
		I'll do my best sir.

EXT SCHOOL GROUNDS - DAY

A bell tolls. Parents begin wishing their boys farewell.

				FATHER
		Hey, come on son.

				MOTHER
		Chin up.

				FATHER
		No tears now.

				BOY
		Okay.

				MOTHER
		Chin up.

Another boy hugs his mother.

				BOY
		I don't want to go here.

				MOTHER
		You be a good boy and do your lessons.

EXT SCHOOL GROUNDS - DAY

Neil emerges from a building and sees Todd.

				NEIL
		Hey, I hear we're gonna be roommates.

He shakes Todd's hand.

				NEIL
		I'm Neil Perry.

				TODD
		Todd Anderson.

				NEIL
		Why'd you leave Balincrest?

				TODD
		My brother went here.

				NEIL
		Oh, so you're that Anderson.

INT DORMATORY - DAY

DR. HAGER is standing in his room doorway while SPAZ and his father are
going over some last minute precautions over the boy's allergies. Spaz's
father hands Hager various bottles.

				FATHER
		This is for sinuses. Oh, and if he can't swallow you
		give him one of these. And if he had trouble breathing
		you can give him some of those.

				HAGER
		All right fine.

Dr. Hager takes the bottles and quickly backs into his room, shutting
the door.

				FATHER
			    (to son)
		Did you remember your vaporizer?

				SPAZ
		Yes, I put it in my room.

Spaz's father tries to say something else to Dr. Hager but realizes he
has already gone.

INT HALLWAY - DAY

Neil pushes his way through a crowd of boys, carrying two suitcases. As
he enters his room, Knox quickly passes by.

				KNOX
		Hey, how's it going Neil?

				NEIL
		Hey Knox.

Cameron comes by and leans against the doorway.

				CAMERON
		Neil, study group tonight?

				NEIL
		Yeah, sure.

				CAMERON
		Business as usual, huh? Hey, I hear you got the new
		kid. Looks like a stiff!

He begins laughing when he notices Todd coming into the room.

				CAMERON
		Oops!

Cameron quickly leaves. Neil tries to keep from laughing as Todd enters
the room and sets his luggage down on his bed.

				NEIL
		Listen, don't mind Cameron. He was born with his
		foot in his mouth. You know what I mean?

He pulls some papers from his blazer pocket and playfully whacks Todd 
across the back with it.

CHARLIE comes to the door with a smug expression on his face. Knox and
MEEKS are close behind him. He points at Neil

				CHARLIE
		Rumor has it, you did summer school.

				NEIL
		Yep. Chemistry. My father thought I should get ahead.
		How was your summer Slick?

				CHARLIE
		Keen.

The boys enter the room. Charlie turns around and looks at Meeks who is
just entering. 

				CHARLIE
		Meeks. Door. Closed.

				MEEKS
		Yes sir.

				NEIL
		Gentlemen, what are the four pillars?

				BOYS
		Travesty. Horror. Decadence. Excrement.

Charlie makes himself comfortable on Neil's bed and lights up a cigarette.
Meanwhile, Todd is by his bed unpacking his luggage.

				CHARLIE
		Okay, study group. Meeks aced Latin. I didn't quite
		flunk English. So, if you want, we've got our study
		group.

				NEIL
		Sure. Cameron asked me too. Anyone mind
		including him?

				CHARLIE
		Hmm, what's his specialty, boot-licking?

				NEIL
		Come on, he's your roommate.

				CHARLIE
		That's not my fault.

Meeks seems to notice Todd for the first time.

				MEEKS
		Oh, I'm sorry, my name is Steven Meeks.

Neil quickly gets up from his spot by the window.

				NEIL
		Oh, this is Todd Anderson.

Todd turns around and shakes hands with Meeks.

				MEEKS
		Nice to meet you.

				TODD
		Nice to meet you.

				CHARLIE
		Charlie Dalton.

Charlie continues to lay on the bed, looking smug. Knox extends a hand.

				KNOX
		Knox Overstreet.

				NEIL
		Todd's brother was Jeffrey Anderson.

				CHARLIE
		Oh yeah, sure. Valedictorian. National merit scholar. 

				MEEKS
		Oh well, welcome to Hell-ton.

				CHARLIE
		It's every bit as tough as they say, unless you're a
		genius like Meeks.

				MEEKS
		He flatters me. That's why I help him with Latin.

				CHARLIE
		And English, and Trig.

Charlie begins coughing. There is a knock at the door. Charlie quickly
stamps out his cigarette on the floor and Neil tries to wave the smoke
from the air.

				NEIL
		It's open.

The door opens and Mr. Perry walks into the room. Neil quickly rises from
the window.

				NEIL
		Father, I thought you'd gone.

The other boys stand up when he enters.

				BOYS
		Mr. Perry.

				MR PERRY
		Keep your seats fellows, keep your seats. Neil, I've
		just spoken to Mr. Nolan. I think that you're taking
		too many extra curricular activities this semester, and
		I've decided that you should drop the school annual.

				NEIL
		But I'm the assistant editor this year.

				MR PERRY
		Well I'm sorry Neil.

				NEIL
		But Father, I can't. It wouldn't be fair.

				MR PERRY
		Fellas, would you excuse us for a moment?

Mr. Perry walks towards the door and Neil hesitantly follows. Mr. Perry
pauses by the door and smiles to the other boys.

INT. HALLWAY - DAY

The smile has gone from Mr. Perry's face. He grabs a hold of Neil's arm.

				MR PERRY
		Don't you ever dispute me in public. Do you
		understand?

				NEIL
		Father, I wasn't disputing-

				MR PERRY
After you've finished medical school and you're on your own, then you
can do as you damn well please. But until then, you do as I tell you.
Is that clear?

				NEIL
		Yes sir. I'm sorry.

				MR PERRY
		You know how much this means to your mother,
		don't you?

				NEIL
		Yes sir. You know me, always taking on too much.

				MR PERRY
		Well, that's my boy. Now listen, you need anything,
		you let us know, huh?

				NEIL
		Yes sir.

Mr. Perry slaps his son on the shoulder and leaves. Neil leans his head
back against the wall as the other boys emerge from the room.

				CHARLIE
		Why doesn't he let you do what you want?

				KNOX
		Yeah Neil, tell him off. It couldn't get any worse.

				NEIL
		Oh, that's rich. Like you guys tell your parents off, Mr.
		Future Lawyer and Mr. Future Banker.

				CHARLIE
		Okay, so I don't like it any more than you do.

				NEIL
		Well just don't tell me how to talk to my father. You
		guys are the same way.

				KNOX
		All right, all right, Jesus. So what are you going to do?

				NEIL
		What I have to do. Drop the annual.

				CHARLIE
		Well I wouldn't lose much sleep over it. It's just a
		bunch of jerks trying to impress Nolan.

				NEIL
		I don't care. I don't give a damn about any of it.

				MEEKS
		Well, uh, Latin, eight o' clock in my room?

				NEIL
		Yes.

				MEEKS
		Todd, you're welcome to join us.

				KNOX
		Yeah, come along pal.

Todd looks up from his desk where he is setting his alarm clock.

				TODD
		Thanks.

EXT. FIELDS - DAY

A clock bell chimes five o'clock. Enormous flocks of birds, apparently
disturbed by the noise, take to the sky.

INT. STAIRCASE - DAY

The sound of squawking birds merges into the sound of noisy boys as they
descend the stairs in a long spiralling line.

MR. MCALLISTER tries to make it upstairs against the steady stream.

				MCALLISTER
		Slow down boys, slow down you horrible
		phalanx of pubescense.

INT CHEMISTRY LAB - DAY

A teacher walks up and down the aisles, handing out books.

				TEACHER
		Pick three laboratory experiments from
		the project list and report on them every
		five weeks. The first twenty questions at
		the end of chapter one are due tomorrow.

The students let out a collective groan.

INT. LATIN CLASSROOM - DAY

Mr. McAllister paces back and forth in front of the blackboard and gets
the students to repeat everything he says.

				MCALLISTER
			    (students repeat after each word.)
		Agricolam. Agricola. Agricolae.
		Agricolarum. Agricolis. Agricolas.
		Agrilcolis.

		Again, please.
		Agricola.

INT. MATH CLASSROOM - DAY

Dr. Hager walks up the classroom aisles with his arms behind his back.

				HAGER
		Your study of trigonometry requires absolute precision.
		Anyone failing to turn in any homework assignment will
		be penalized one point off their final grade. Let me urge
		you now not to test me on this point.

INT. KEATING'S CLASSROOM - DAY

Students enter Keating's classroom, talking and acting up. Keating
glances out from his room off to one side.

				KNOX
		Hey Spaz, Spaz.

Spaz turns around in time to be hit by a ball of crumpled up paper
while Cameron smacks him on the shoulder.

				CAMERON
		Brain damage.

The students quickly quiet down as Keating emerges from the other room,
whistling the 1812 Overture. He walks up the length of the classroom and
out the door without a word. The students look around at one another,
uncertain of what to do. Keating pokes his head back in the doorway.

				KEATING
		Well come on.

He gestures them to follow and the students, after some hesitation, grab
their books and follow Keating out into the main entranceway. 

INT. ENTRANCEWAY - DAY

Keating stands before the school's trophy cabinets and waits until all
the boys arrive.

				KEATING
		"Oh Captain, My Captain" who knows where
		that comes from?

Todd looks up as if he knows the answer, but says nothing. Spaz blows his
nose a little too close to Meeks for his liking.

				KEATING
		Not a clue? It's from a poem by Walt
		Whitman about Mr. Abraham Lincoln. Now in
		this class you can call me Mr. Keating. Or,
		if you're slightly more daring, Oh Captain,
		My Captain.

The students laugh slightly.

				KEATING
		Now let me dispel a few rumors so they
		don't fester into facts. Yes, I too
		attended Hell-ton and survived. And no,
		at that time I was not the mental giant
		you see before you. I was the intellectual
		equivalent of a ninety-eight pound
		weakling. I would go to the beach and
		people would kick copies of Byron in my
		face.

The boys laugh once again, while Cameron, obviously trying to write all
this down, looks around confusedly. Keating looks down at papers in his
hand.

				KEATING
		Now, Mr… Pitts. That's a rather
		unfortunate name. Mr. Pitts, where are
		you?

Pitts raises his hand while everyone around him snickers.

				KEATING
Mr. Pitts, would you open your hymnal to page 542 and read the first
stanza of the poem you find there?

				PITTS
		"To the virgins, to make much of time"?

				KEATING
		Yes, that's the one. Somewhat appropriate,
		isn't it.

				PITTS
		"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, old
		time is still a flying, and this same
		flower that smiles today, tomorrow will
		be dying."

				KEATING
		Thank you Mr. Pitts. "Gather ye rosebuds
		while ye may." The Latin term for that
		sentiment is Carpe Diem. Now who knows
		what that means?

Meeks immediately puts his hand up.

				MEEKS
		Carpe Diem. That's "seize the day."

				KEATING
		Very good, Mr.-

				MEEKS
		Meeks.

				KEATING
		Meeks. Another unusual name. Seize the
		day. Gather ye rosebuds while ye may.
		Why does the writer use these lines?

				CHARLIE
		Because he's in a hurry.

				KEATING
		No, ding!

Keating slams his hand down on an imaginary buzzer.

				KEATING
		Thank you for playing anyway. Because we
		are food for worms lads. Because, believe
		it or not, each and every one of us in
		this room is one day going to stop
		breathing, turn cold, and die. 

Keating turns towards the trophy cases, filled with trophies, footballs,
and team pictures.

				KEATING
		Now I would like you to step forward over
		here and peruse some of the faces from
		the past. You've walked past them many
		times. I don't think you've really looked
		at them.

The students slowly gather round the cases and Keating moves behind them.

				KEATING
		They're not that different from you, are
		they? Same haircuts. Full of hormones,
		just like you. Invincible, just like you
		feel. The world is their oyster. They
		believe they're destined for great things,
		just like many of you. Their eyes are full
		of hope, just like you. Did they wait until
		it was too late to make from their lives
		even one iota of what they were capable?
		Because you see gentlmen, these boys are
		now fertilizing daffodils. But if you listen
		real close, you can hear them whisper their
		legacy to you. Go on, lean in.

The boys lean in and Keating hovers over Cameron's shoulder.

				KEATING
			    (whispering in a gruff voice)
		Carpe.

Cameron looks over his shoulder with an aggravated expression on his face. 

				KEATING
		Hear it?
			    (whispering again)
		Carpe. Carpe Diem. Seize the day boys,
		make your lives extraordinary.

The boys stare at the faces in the cabinet in silence.

EXT. SCHOOL STEPS - DAY

The boys emerge from the school, loaded down with numerous books.

				PITTS
		That was weird.

				NEIL
		But different.

				KNOX
		Spooky if you ask me.

				CAMERON
		Think he'll test us on that stuff?

				CHARLIE
		Come on Cameron, don't you get anything?

				CAMERON
		What? What?

INT. LOCKER ROOM - EVENING

A coach sticks his head around the corner into the room.

				COACH
		Let's go boys, hustle up in here. That
		means you Dalton.

Meeks emerges from the showers, drying himself off.

				MEEKS
		Okay, who's up for a trig study group
		tonight guys?

				PITTS
		Me.

				NEIL
		Me.

				CHARLIE
			(still annoyed by what the coach said)
		What?

				KNOX
		I can't make it guys. I have to have
		dinner at the Danburry's house.

				PITTS
		The Danburry's? Who are the Danburry's?

				CAMERON
		Big alumns. How'd you swing that?

				KNOX
		Friends of my Dad's. They're probably in
		their nineties or something.

				CHARLIE
		Ooh!

				NEIL
		Anything's better than Hell-ton hash.

				CHARLIE
		I'll second that.

				KNOX
		Yeah we'll see.

Neil approaches Todd, who's been sitting by the window staring down at the
floor. Neil snaps his fingers to get Todd's attention. 

				NEIL
		Hey, you coming to the study group tonight?

				TODD
		Uh, no, no I, uh, I've got some history I
		wanna do.

				NEIL
		Suit yourself.

INT. TODD'S ROOM - EVENING

Todd is seated at his desk. He scrawls "CARPE DIEM" across a blank page
of his notebook. He looks at it for a few moments before crumpling it up
and opening up his Chemistry book.

INT. ENTRANCEWAY - NIGHT

Hager comes down the stairs. Knox is looking at one of the old class photos
on the walls.

				HAGER
		Ready Overstreet?

Knox reluctantly follows after Dr. Hager.

				KNOX
		Ready to go sir.

EXT. ROAD - NIGHT

The car leaves Welton and drives towards the Danburry's house.

INT / EXT DANBURRY'S HOUSE - NIGHT

The doorbell rings.

				MRS DANBURRY (O.S.)
		Chet, can you get that?

				CHET (O.S.)
		I can't, Mom.

				CHRIS (O.S.)
		I'll get it.

The door opens and Knox is awe-struck by the beautiful girl (CHRIS) who
has answered the door.

				CHRIS
		Can I help you?

Knox manages to break out of his daze.

				KNOX
		Hi. Knox Overstreet. Uh, Dr. Hager.

				CHRIS
		Hi.

				KNOX
		This is the Danburry's, right?

				CHRIS
		Are you here to see Chet?

				KNOX
		Mrs. Danburry?

Chris begins to laugh as Mrs. Danburry arrives behind her.

				CHRIS
		No.

				MRS DANBURRY
		Sorry. Thank you Chris. I'm Mrs. Danburry.
		You must be Knox.

				KNOX
		Yes.

				MRS DANBURRY
			    (to Dr. Hager)
		Back by nine.
			    (to Knox)
		Please come in.

				CHET (O.S.)
		Chris, come on, what are you doing?

				CHRIS
		Chet, I'm coming.

Knox enters the house, his mind still hung up on Chris as MR DANBURRY
comes out of the living room to meet him.

				MR DANBURRY
		Knox. How are you? Joe Danburry.

				KNOX
		Nice to meet you sir.

				MR DANBURRY
		Well he's the spitting image of his father,
		isn't he. How is he? Come on in.

				CHET (O.S.)
		Chris!

				KNOX
		He's great. He just did a big case for GM.

				CHRIS (O.S.)
		I'm coming.

				MR DANBURRY
		I know where you're headed, like father
		like son, huh?

INT. STUDENT LOUNGE - NIGHT

Several students are throwing darts at a small rubber skeleton hanging
from the bulletin board. Various students are studying and playing games.
Meeks and Pitts are sitting at one table working on their "hi-fi system".
Meeks is waving an antenna around with no luck. Pitts points out to him
that he forgot to plug it in. Neil, Cameron, and Charlie are working on
their trig homework.

				CAMERON
		Just replace these numbers here with "x",
		for "x" and "y".

				NEIL
		Of course.

				CAMERON
		Of course, so what's the problem?

Charlie enters the room and closes the door behind him, leaning up
against it heavily.

				CHARLIE
		How was dinner?

				KNOX
		Huh?

				CHARLIE
		How was dinner?

				KNOX
		Terrible. Awful.

He leaves the door and sits down with the other boys.

				CHARLIE
		Why? What happened?

				KNOX
		Tonight, I met the most beautiful girl
		in my entire life.

				NEIL
		Are you crazy? What's wrong with that?

				KNOX
		She's practically engaged. To Chet Danburry.

				CHARLIE
		That guy could eat a football.

				PITTS
		That's too bad.

				KNOX
		Too bad? It's worse than too bad Pitsie,
		it's a tragedy. A girl this beautiful in
		love with such a jerk.

				PITTS
		All the good ones go for jerks, you
		know that.

				CAMERON
		Ahh, forget her. Open your trig book and
		try and figure out problem five.

				KNOX
		I can't just forget her Cameron. And I
		can't think about trig.

The radio Meeks and Pitts were working on begins letting out a high
pitched hum.

				PITTS
		We got it.

				MEEKS
		Holy cow.

Mr. Hager walks into the room.

				HAGER
		All right gentlemen, five minutes. Let's
		go.

The students quickly pack up their gear and prepare to leave. Pitts tries
to hide the radio in his lap. Charlie leans in close to Knox.

				CHARLIE
		Did you see her naked?

				KNOX
		Very funny Dalton.

				HAGER
		That wouldn't be a radio in your lap,
		would it Mr. Pitts?

				PITTS
		No sir. Science experiment, radar.

Meeks holds up the antenna as if demonstrating it.

INT. KEATING'S CLASSROOM - DAY

Keating sits at his desk at the front of the classroom and opens up one
of his books.

				KEATING
		Gentlemen, open your text to page
		twenty-one of the introduction. Mr.
		Perry, will you read the opening
		paragraph of the preface, entitled
		"Understanding Poetry"?

				NEIL
		Understanding Poetry, by Dr. J. Evans
		Pritchard, Ph.D. To fully understand
		poetry, we must first be fluent with
		its meter, rhyme, and figures of speech.
		Then ask two questions: One, how artfully
		has the objective of the poem been
		rendered, and two, how important is that
		objective. Question one rates the poem's
		perfection, question two rates its
		importance. And once these questions have
		been answered, determining a poem's
		greatest becomes a relatively simple
		matter.

Keating gets up from his desk and prepares to draw on the chalk board.

				NEIL
		If the poem's score for perfection is
		plotted along the horizontal of a graph,
		and its importance is plotted on the
		vertical, then calculating the total
		area of the poem yields the measure of
		its greatness.

Keating draws a corresponding graph on the board and the students
dutifully copy it down.

				NEIL
		A sonnet by Byron may score high on the
		vertical, but only average on the
		horizontal. A Shakespearean sonnet, on
		the other hand, would score high both
		horizontally and vertically, yielding a
		massive total area, thereby revealing the
		poem to be truly great. As you proceed
		through the poetry in this book, practice
		this rating method. As your ability to
		evaluate poems in this matter grows, so
		will - so will your enjoyment and
		understanding of poetry.

Neil sets the book down and takes off his glasses. The student sitting
across from him is discretely trying to eat. Keating turns away from
the chalkboard with a smile.

				KEATING
		Excrement. That's what I think of Mr. J.
		Evans Pritchard. We're not laying pipe,
		we're talking about poetry.

Cameron looks down at the graph he copied into his notes and quickly
scribbles it out.

				KEATING
		I mean, how can you describe poetry like
		American Bandstand? I like Byron, I give
		him a 42, but I can't dance to it.

Charlie suddenly appear to become interested in the class.

				KEATING
		Now I want you to rip out that page.

The students look at Keating as if he has just gone mad.

				KEATING
		Go on, rip out the entire page. You heard
		me, rip it out. Rip it out!

Charlie looks around at the others. He then looks down at his own notes,
which consists of drawing breasts.

				KEATING
		Go on, rip it out.

Charlie rips the page out and holds it up.

				KEATING
		Thank you Mr. Dalton. Gentlemen, tell you
		what, don't just tear out that page, tear
		out the entire introduction. I want it
		gone, history. Leave nothing of it. Rip
		it out. Rip! Begone J. Evans Pritchard,
		Ph.D. Rip, shred, tear. Rip it out. I
		want to hear nothing but ripping of Mr.
		Pritchard.

Meeks looks around reluctantly and then finally begins tearing out pages.

				KEATING
		We'll perforate it, put it on a roll.

Keating sees Cameron still hesitating.

				KEATING
		It's not the bible, you're not going to
		go to hell for this. Go on, make a clean
		tear, I want nothing left of it.

Keating goes over to his room. Cameron turns around to Neil.

				CAMERON
		We shouldn't be doing this.

				NEIL
		Rip, rip, rip!

Neil makes Cameron turn back around.

				KEATING (O.S.)
		Rip it out, rip!

From outside the classroom, Mr. McAllister hears all the noise and sees
all the students ripping out the pages. He bursts into the room.

				MCALLISTER
		What the hell is going on here?

The boys all turn around in shock. Charlie stuffs a crumpled page into his
mouth. Keating emerges from his room with a waste paper basket.

				KEATING
		I don't hear enough rips.

				MCALLISTER
		Mr. Keating.

				KEATING
		Mr. McAllister.

				MCALLISTER
		I'm sorry, I- I didn't know you were
		here.

				KEATING
		I am.

				MCALLISTER
		Ahh, so you are. Excuse me.

Mr. McAllister slowly backs out of the classroom.

				KEATING
		Keep ripping gentlemen. This is a battle,
		a war. And the casualties could be your
		hearts and souls. 

Keating holds out the basket to Charlie who spits out a wad of paper.

				KEATING
		Thank you Mr. Dalton. Armies of academics
		going forward, measuring poetry. No, we
		will not have that here. No more of Mr.
		J. Evans Pritchard. Now in my class you
		will learn to think for yourselves again.
		You will learn to savor words and language.
		No matter what anybody tells you, words and
		ideas can change the world. I see that look
		in Mr. Pitt's eye, like nineteenth century
		literature has nothing to do with going to
		business school or medical school. Right?
		Maybe. Mr. Hopkins, you may agree with him, 
		thinking "Yes, we should simply study our
		Mr. Pritchard and learn our rhyme and meter
		and go quietly about the business of
		achieving other ambitions." I have a little
		secret for ya. Huddle up. Huddle up! 

The boys get up from their seats and gather around Keating in the center
of the class.

				KEATING
		We don't read and write poetry because
		it's cute. We read and write poetry
		because we are members of the human race.
		And the human race is filled with passion.
		Medicine, law, business, engineering,
		these are all noble pursuits, and necessary
		to sustain life. But poetry, beauty,
		romance, love, these are what we stay alive
		for. To quote from Whitman: "O me, o life
		of the questions of these recurring, of the
		endless trains of the faithless, of cities
		filled with the foolish. What good amid
		these, o me, o life? Answer: that you are
		here. That life exists, and identity.
		That the powerful play goes on, and you
		may contribute a verse. That the powerful
		play goes on and you may contribute a verse.

Keating looks up at Todd.

				Keating
		What will your verse be?

INT. HEAD OF CAFETERIA - DAY

The cafeteria is filled with students and teachers standing before the tables saying grace.

				ALL
		For what we are about to receive, may the
		Lord make us truly grateful. Amen.

Mr. Keating and Mr. McAllister are seated next to one another at the table.

				MCALLISTER
		Quite an interesting class you gave today,
		Mr. Keating.

				KEATING
		I'm sorry if I shocked you, Mr. McAllister.

				MCALLISTER
		Oh, there's no need to apologize. It was
		very fascinating, misguided though it was.

				KEATING
		You think so?

				MCALLISTER
		You take a big risk by encouraging them to
		be artists John. When they realize they're
		not Rembrandts, Shakespeares or Mozarts,
		they'll hate you for it.

				KEATING
		We're not talking artists George, we're
		talking free thinkers.

				MCALLISTER
		Free thinkers at seventeen?

				KEATING
		Funny, I never pegged you as a cynic.

				MCALLISTER
			  (taken aback by the comment)
		Not a cynic, a realist. Show me the heart
		unfettered by foolish dreams, and I'll
		show you a happy man.

				KEATING
		But only in their dreams can man be truly
		free. 'Twas always thus, and always thus
		will be.

				MCALLISTER
		Tennyson?

				KEATING
		No, Keating.

Keating winks and Mr. McAllister can't help but laugh.

INT. CAFETERIA TABLE - DAY

Neil joins the others at the table. He pulls out a yearbook.

				NEIL
		Hey, I found his senior annual in the
		library.

He hands the annual over to Cameron who laughs at the younger picture of Keating.

				NEIL
		Listen to this, captain of the soccer team,
		editor of the school annual, Cambridge
		bound, Thigh man, and the Dead Poets Society.

				CAMERON
			    (reading from the annual)
		Man most likely to do anything.

				CHARLIE
		Thigh man. Mr. K was a hell-raiser.

				KNOX
		What's the Dead Poets Society?

				NEIL
		I don't know.

				MEEKS
		Is there a picture in the annual?

				NEIL
		Nothing. No other mention of it.

				MR. NOLAN (O.S.)
		That boy there, see me after lunch.

Cameron quickly puts the annual away and the others all return to their meal.

EXT. WELTON GROUNDS - DAY

Keating is walking down towards the lake, whistling the same tune as before.
The boys emerge from the building and chase after him.

				NEIL
		Mr. Keating? Mr. Keating? Sir? Oh Captain,
		My Captain?

Keating immediately turns around.

				KEATING
		Gentlemen.

				NEIL
		We were just looking in your old annual.

He hands Keating the annual and Keating looks at his old photograph.

				KEATING
		Oh my God. No, that's not me. Stanley
		"The Tool" Wilson-

Keating crouches down and continues looking through the book.

				KEATING
		God.

Neil crouches down next to Keating.

				NEIL
		What was the Dead Poets Society?

				KEATING
		I doubt the present administration would
		look too favorably upon that.

				NEIL
		Why? What was it?

				KEATING
		Gentlemen, can you keep a secret?

				NEIL
		Sure.

The other boys crouch down around Keating.

				KEATING
		The Dead Poets were dedicated to sucking
		the marrow out of life. That's a phrase
		from Thoreau that we'd invoke at the
		beginning of each meeting. You see we'd
		gather at the old Indian cave and take
		turns reading from Thoreau, Whitman,
		Shelley; the biggies. Even some of our
		own verse. And in the enchantment of the
		moment we'd let poetry work its magic.

				KNOX
		You mean it was a bunch of guys sitting
		around reading poetry?

				KEATING
		No Mr. Overstreet, it wasn't just "guys",
		we weren't a Greek organization, we were
		romantics. We didn't just read poetry,
		we let it drip from our tongues like honey.
		Spirits soared, women swooned, and gods
		were created, gentlemen, not a bad way to
		spend an evening eh? Thank you Mr. Perry
		for this trip down amnesia lane. Burn that,
		especially my picture.

Keating hands the annual back and walks away, whistling once again. Neil
remains crouched.

				NEIL
		Dead Poets Society.

				CAMERON
		What?

The school bells begin ringing and everyone heads back towards the school.
Neil stands up.

				NEIL
		I say we go tonight.

				CHARLIE
		Tonight?

				CAMERON
		Wait a minute.

				PITTS
		Where's this cave he's talking about?

				NEIL
		It's beyond the stream. I know where it
		is.

				PITTS
		That's miles.

				CAMERON
		Sounds boring to me.

				CHARLIE
		Don't go.

				CAMERON
		You know how many de-merits we're talking
		Dalton

				CHARLIE
		So don't come, please.

				CAMERON
		Look, all I'm saying is that we have to
		be careful, we can't get caught.

				CHARLIE
		No shit, Sherlock.

				HAGER
				(yelling)
		You boys there, hurry up.

Neil turns around and faces the other boys.

				NEIL
		All right, who's in?

				CAMERON
		Come on Neil, Hager's right-

				NEIL
		Forget Hager, no. Who's in?

				CHARLIE
		I'm in.

				HAGER (O.S.)
		I'm warning you, move.

				CAMERON
		Me too.

				PITTS
		I don't know Neil

				NEIL
		What? Pitts-

				CHARLIE
		Pitsie, come on.

				MEEKS
		His grades are hurting Charlie.

				NEIL
		You can help him Meeks.

				PITTS
		What is this, a midnight study group?

				NEIL
		Forget it Pitts, you're coming. Meeks,
		are your grades hurting too?

				MEEKS
		I'll try anything once.

				CHARLIE
		Except sex.

				MEEKS
		Ha ha ha.

				CAMERON
		I mean as long as we're careful.

The boys run into the building.

				CHARLIE
		What about you Knox?

				KNOX
		I don't know Charlie.

				CHARLIE
		Come on Knox, it'll help you get Chris.

				KNOX
		Yeah? How?

				CHARLIE
		Women swoon.

Charlie laughs and runs inside. Knox chases after him.

				KNOX
		But why do they swoon? Charlie, tell me
		why they swoon. Charlie!

INT LIBRARY - DAY

The boys are all gathered around one of the tables with a map laid out
on it.

				NEIL
			    (whispering)
		Okay, follow the stream to the waterfall.
		It's right there. It's got to be on the
		banks.

				CAMERON
		I don't know, it's starting to sound
		dangerous.

				CHARLIE
		Well, why don't you stay home?

				MCALLISTER
		For God's sake stop chattering and
		sit down.

The boys take their seats once again and Neil goes over and sits next to
Todd, who is sitting by himself.

				NEIL
		Todd, are you coming tonight?

				TODD
		No.

				NEIL
		Why not? God, you were there. You heard
		Keating. Don't you want to do something
		about it?

				TODD
		Yes, but-

				NEIL
		But? But what?

				TODD
		Keating said that everybody took turns
		reading and I don't want to do that.

				NEIL
		Gosh, you really have a problem with
		that, don't you?

				TODD
		N- no, I don't have a problem. Neil,
		I just- I just don't want to do it,
		okay?

				NEIL
		All right. What if you didn't have to
		read? What if you just came and
		listened?

				TODD
		That's not how it works.

				NEIL
		Forget how it works. What if - what if
		they said it was okay?

				TODD
		What? What are you gonna do, go up and
		ask them?

Neil shrugs.

				TODD
		No. No, Neil.

				NEIL
		I'll be right back.

				TODD
		Neil, Neil!

Neil gets up and rejoins the others. McAllister hears the boys whispering
again.

				MCALLISTER
		Oh shut up, will you.

INT BATHROOM - NIGHT

Various boys are crowded around the sinks getting ready for bed. Someone
is playing snake charmer music on a kazoo while someone else is bothering
Spaz with a red sock puppet acting like a snake.

				SPAZ
		That's my- that's for my asthma, okay.
		Could you give that back please? Could
		you give that back?

				BOY
		What's the matter? Don't you like snakes?

Neil enters and taps Todd on the shoulder.

				NEIL
		You're in.

				SPAZ
		Get away from me, okay?

				BOY
		Spaz, why don't you check your pocket,
		huh? Come on Spaz I have to brush my
		teeth

				SPAZ
		Get a- get off, 

Hager walks past the bathroom and into his room.

				HAGER
		Cut out that racket in there.

The kazoo player lets out a rude squeek before finally stopping. Hager
glares at them for a moment.

INT NEIL'S BEDROOM - NIGHT

Neil stands in his doorway. He looks across the hall to the other room
where Cameron and Charlie are standing. Cameron gives a thumbs up. Neil
closes his room door and takes out his cloak and a flashlight. Setting
the flashlight down on the desk, he notices a worn book, "Five
Centuries of Verse", sitting there. Opening it up, he sees John Keating's
name at the top followed by "Dead Poets". Below the title of the book,
is written: "To Be Read At The Opening of D.P.S. Meetings." Along with
several lines from Thoreau, beginning with "I went to the woods because
I wanted to live deliberately…"

INT STAIRWAY - NIGHT

The shadows of hooded figures can be seen moving throughout the darkened
halls.

INT HAGER'S ROOM - NIGHT

Hager hears a dog barking.

INT HALLWAY - NIGHT

Someone drops a number of dog biscuits by the dog's feet. He stops
barking and immediately begins gobbling them down. Hager looks out
into the hallway with his flashlight but sees nothing.

EXT SCHOOL GROUNDS - NIGHT

The boys quietly leave the building and set off running across the
fields towards the woods.

EXT WOODS - NIGHT

The boys search about the trees trying to find the cave. Meeks is
searching around when Charlie leaps up behind Meeks in the dark
shining the flashlight up at his own face and grabs Meeks by the
shoulder.

				CHARLIE
		Arrr, I'm a dead poet.

				MEEKS
		Aww, Charlie.

				CHARLIE
			    (laughing)
		Guys, over here.

				MEEKS
		You're funny. You're real funny.

INT CAVE - NIGHT

The boys are trying to start a fire. The cave is quickly filling up with
smoke.

				MEEKS
		It's too wet.

CHARLIE
		God, are you trying to smoke us out of
		here?

				MEEKS
		No, no, the smoke's going right up this
		opening.

Pitts tries to stand up and slams his head into the low rock ceiling. He
lets out a yell while the others laugh.

				NEIL
		You okay?

				PITTS
		Oh God. Clowns.

				NEIL
		All right, all right, forget the fire.
		Let's go gentlemen.

Neil stands before the others with the book in hand, and takes a drag
on a cigarette.

				NEIL
		I hereby reconvene the Dead Poets
		Society.

The boys cheer.

				NEIL
		Welton chapter. The meetings will be
		conducted by myself and the other new
		initiates now present. Todd Anderson,
		because he prefers not to read, will
		keep minutes of the meetings. I'll now
		read the traditional opening message by
		society member Henry David Thoreau. "I
		went to the woods because I wanted to
		live deliberately. I wanted to live deep
		and suck out all the marrow of life."

				CHARLIE
		I'll second that.

				NEIL
		"To put to rout all that was not life,
		and not, when I had come to die,
		discover that I had not lived.

Several boys whistle softly in reaction to the poem.

				NEIL
		And Keating's marked a bunch of other
		pages.

Neil begins flipping through the book.

				CHARLIE
		All right, intermission. Dig deep right
		here. Right here, lay it down

				CAMERON
		On the mud? We're gonna put our food on
		the mud?

				CHARLIE
		Meeks, put your coat down. Picnic blanket.

				MEEKS
		Yes sir, use Meeks' coat.

				CHARLIE
		Don't keep anything back either. You
		guys are always bumming my smokes.

Meeks lays his coat down and everyone dumps their food on it. Amongst
the pile are chocolate chip cookies, a box of raisins, a few apples, an
orange, and half a roll.

				NEIL
		Raisins?

				KNOX
		Yuck.

				CHARLIE
		Wait a minute, who gave us half a roll?

				PITTS
			  (talking with his mouth full)
		I'm eating the other half.

				CHARLIE
		Come on.

				PITTS
		You want me to put it back?

INT CAVE - NIGHT

Neil, lit up by a flashlight, begins to tell everyone a story.

				NEIL
		It was a dark and rainy night, and this
		old lady, who had a passion for jigsaw
		puzzles, sat by herself in her house at
		her table to complete a new jigsaw puzzle.
		But as she pieced the puzzle together, she
		realized, to her astonishment, that the
		image that was formed was her very own
		room. And the figure in the center of the
		puzzle, as she completed it, was herself.
		And with trembling hands, she placed the
		last four pieces and stared in horror at
		the face of a demented madman at the
		window. The last thing that this old lady
		ever heard was the sound of breaking glass.

				BOYS
		Ohhh… no…

				NEIL
		This is true, this is true.

				CAMERON
		I've got one that's even better than
		that.

				CHARLIE
		Ha!

				CAMERON
		I do. There's a young, married couple,
		and they're driving through the forest
		at night on a long trip. And they run
		out of gas, and there's a madman on the-

				CHARLIE
		The thing with the hand-

All the boys react, recalling the story and miming the scraping on the
roof of the car.

				CAMERON
		I love that story.

				CHARLIE
		I told you that one.

				CAMERON
		You did not. I got that in camp in
		sixth grade.

				CHARLIE
		When were you in six, last year?

As everyone's voices begin to calm down, Pitts begins reading from the
book.

				PITTS
		"In a mean abode in the shanking road,
		lived a man named William Bloat. Now,
		he had a wife, the plague of his life,
		who continually got his goat. And one
		day at dawn, with her nightshift on,
		he slit her bloody throat."

The boys laugh.

				PITTS
		Oh, and it gets worse.

				CHARLIE
		You want to hear a real poem?

Meeks hands Charlie the book but he shoves it away.

				CHARLIE
		All right? No, I don't need it. You take 
		it. 

				MEEKS
		What, did you bring one? 

				NEIL
		You memorized a poem? 

				CHARLIE
		I didn't memorize a poem. Move up.

Neil moves to the side as Charlie stands and takes his spot.

				MEEKS
		An original piece by Charlie Dalton. 

				KNOX
		An original piece. 

				PITTS
		Take center stage. 

				NEIL
		You know this is history. Right? This is 
		history.

Charlie clears his throat and pulls out a page from a magazine and 
slowly unfolds it, revealing a Playboy centerfold (Elaine Reynolds,
Miss October, 1959)

				MEEKS
		Oh, wow. 

				CAMERON
		Where did you get that? 

				CHARLIE

		Teach me to love? Go teach thyself more 
		wit.
		I, chief professor, am of it.

Neil gets up and looks over Charlie's shoulder to see what he is
reading.

				CHARLIE
		The god of love, if such a thing there 
		be, may learn to love from me.

Charlie winks at the guys and they clap and cheer.

				NEIL
		Wow! Did you write that?

Charlie turns over the centerfold to show where he had written down
the poem.

				CHARLIE
		Abraham Cowley. Okay, who's next? 

Neil sits reading from the book by flashlight.

				NEIL
		Alfred Lord Tennyson. 
		Come my friends, 
		'Tis not too late to seek a newer world 
		for my purpose holds to sail beyond the 
		sunset. 
		And though we are not now that strength 
		which in old days 
		Moved earth and heaven; that which we 
		are, we are;-- 
		One equal temper of heroic hearts, 
		Made weak by time and fate, but strong 
		in will. 
		To strive, to seek, to find, and not to 
		yield. 

Meeks takes center stage and begins reading a poem like he is 
performing a chant.

				MEEKS
		Then I had religion, then I had a 
		vision. 
		I could not turn from their revel in 
		derision. 
		Then I saw the Congo creeping through 
		the black, 
		cutting through the forest with a golden 
		track. 
		Then I saw the Congo creeping through 
		the black- 

				CHARLIE
		Meeks, Meeks. 

				MEEKS

		...cutting through the forest with a 
		golden track.
		Then I saw the Congo creeping through 
		the black, 
		cutting through the forest with a golden 
		track.

Knox picks up a metal container and begins using it as a drum. The
other boys stand and begin going in a circle, making music with
sticks of wood, combs, etc.

		Then I saw the Congo creeping through 
		the black, 
		cutting through the forest with a golden 
		track. 
		Then I saw the Congo creeping through 
		the black, 
		cutting through the forest with a golden 
		track. 

				BOYS

		Then I saw the Congo creeping through 
		the black, 
		cutting through the forest with...

The boys continue to chant the chorus as they emerge from the
cave.

EXT. CAMPUS - NIGHT
The clock tolls two as the boys silently run back to their dorm.

INT. KEATING'S CLASSROOM - DAY

Keating is walking to the front of the classroom filled with students.

				KEATING
		A man is not very tire, he is exhausted.
		And don't use very sad, use-

He points to the back of the classroom.

				KEATING
		Come on, Mr. Overstreet, you twerp, 
				KNOX
		Morose? 

				KEATING
		Exactly! Morose. Now, language was 
		developed for one endeavor, and that is? 
		Mr. Anderson? Come on! Are you a man or 
		an amoeba?

Keating stands before Todd's desk. Todd looks up nervously but
says nothing. Keating paused for a moment before looking away.

				KEATING
		Mr. Perry? 

				NEIL
		Uh, to communicate. 

				KEATING
		No! To woo women. Today we're going to 
		be talking about William Shakespeare. 

The class lets out a collective sigh.
				BOY
		Oh, God! 

				KEATING
		I know. A lot of you looked forward to 
		this about as much as you look forward 
		to root canal work. We're gonna talk 
		about Shakespeare as someone who writes 
		something very interesting. Now, many of 
		you have seen Shakespeare done very much 
		like this:

Keating holds out his right arm dramtically and begins to
speak in an exaggerated British accent.

		"O Titus, bring your friend hither." But
		if any of you have seen Mr. Marlon Brando,
		you know, Shakespeare can be different. 
		"Friend, Romans, countrymen, lend me your
		ears." You can also imagine, maybe, John
		Wayne as Macbeth going, "Well, is this a 
		dagger I see before me?"

INT. KEATING'S CLASSROOM - DAY

The students are all seated together near the front of the room as
Keating reads from a book.

				KEATING
		"Dogs, sir? Oh, not just now. I do enjoy 
		a good dog once in a while, sir. You can 
		have yourself a three-course meal from 
		one dog. Start with your canine 
		crudites, go to your Fido flambe for 
		main course and for dessert, a Pekingese 
		parfait. And you can pick your teeth 
		with a little paw."

INT. KEATING'S CLASSROOM - DAY

The students are all back in their normal seats and Keating leaps
up onto his desk.

				KEATING
		Why do I stand up here? Anybody? 

				CHARLIE
		To feel taller. 

				KEATING
		No!
Keating rings the bell on his desk with his foot

				KEATING
		Thank you for playing, Mr. Dalton. I 
		stand upon my desk to remind yourself 
		that we must constantly look at things 
		in a different way. 

Keating glances around the classroom from atop the desk.

				KEATING
		You see, the world looks very different 
		from up here. You don't believe me? Come 
		see for yourself. Come on. Come on! 

Charlie and Neil quickly rise from their seats to go to the front
of the classroom. The rest of the class follows them. While Keating
continues speaking, Neil and Charlie join him on the desk and then
Keating jumps down.


				KEATING
		Just when you think you know something, 
		you have to look at it in another way. 
		Even though it may seem silly or wrong, 
		you must try! Now, when you read, don't 
		just consider what the author thinks. 
		Consider what you think. 

				KEATING
		Boys, you must strive to find your own 
		voice. Because the longer you wait to 
		begin, the less likely you are to find 
		it at all. Thoreau said, "Most men lead 
		lives of quiet desperation." Don't be 
		resigned to that. Break out!

Keating notices Spaz and another boy leaving the desk immediately.

				KEATING
		Don't just walk off the edge like lemmings.
		Look around you. 

The school bell rings as the boys continue to climb onto the desk.
Keating begins to gather up his stuff. The clock begins to toll as
Keating walks to the back of the class.

				KEATING
		There! There you go, Mr. Priske. Thank 
		you! Yes! Dare to strike out and find 
		new ground. Now, in addition to your 
		essays, I would like you to compose a 
		poem of your own, an original work.

The students begin to groan. Keating begins flickering the lights
off and on while chanting ominously.

				KEATING
		That's right! You have to deliver it 
		aloud in front of the class on Monday. 
		Bonne chance, gentlemen. 

Keating steps out into the hall before quickly peeking back in once again.
Todd is the last one to stand on the desk and is about to jump off.

				KEATING
		Mr. Anderson? Don't think that I don't 
		know that this assignment scares the 
		hell out of you, you mole.

Keating flicks the light off, leaving Todd to jump down in the darkness
as the students laugh.

EXT. RIVER - DAY

Cameron, Charlie, and several other boys are rowing while Mr. Nolan
shouts orders from a bullhorn.

				MR. NOLAN
		Take a power train in two! Three! Keep 
		your eyes in the boat!

EXT. CAMPUS ROOFTOP - DAY

Noisy static is replaced by music as Pitts climbs down form the peak to
join Meeks at their makeshift radio.

				MEEKS
		We got it, Pittsie. We got it! Radio 
		Free America! 


EXT CAMPUS - DAY

Several students are fencing on a grassy slope.

EXT. CAMPUS ROOFTOP - DAY

Meeks and Pitts perform a goofy dance together to the music.

INT. TODD'S ROOM - DAY

Todd is on his bed trying to write a poem. The door opens and Todd
turns his writing pad over. Neil enters the room laughing. He crouches
down next to Todd's bed and plunks a sheet of paper in Todd's lap.


				NEIL
		I found it. 

				TODD
		You found what? 

				NEIL
		What I wanna do right now. What's 
		really, really inside me. 

				TODD
		"A Midsummer Night's Dream"? 

				NEIL
		This is it. 

				TODD
		What is this? 

				NEIL
		It's a play, dummy. 

				TODD
		I know that. I-- Wh-Wh-What does it have 
		to do with you? 

				NEIL
		Right. They're putting it on at Henley 
		Hall. Open tryouts. Open tryouts! 

				TODD
		Yes, so?

Neil pounds on the bed and then pulls a blanket off his bed,
wearing it like a cloak.

				NEIL
		So, I'm gonna act. Yes, yes! I'm gonna 
		be an actor! Ever since I can remember, 
		I've wanted to try this. I even tried to 
		go to summer stock auditions last year, 
		but, of course, my father wouldn't let 
		me. For the first time in my whole life 
		I know what I wanna do.

Neil grabs a handful of papers off Todd's bed and tosses them into
the air.

				NEIL
		and for the first time I'm gonna do it 
		whether my father wants me to or not!
		Carpe diem! 

				TODD
		Neil, Neil, hold on a minute. How are 
		you gonna be in a play if your father 
		won't let you? 

				NEIL
		First I gotta get the part, then I can 
		worry about that. 

				TODD
		Yeah, but won't he kill you if he finds 
		out you went to an audition and didn't 
		even tell him? 

				NEIL
		No, no, no, no. As far as I'm concerned, 
		he won't have to know about any of this. 

				TODD
		Well, that's impossible. 

				NEIL
		Bullshit! Nothing's impossible. 

				TODD
		Well, why don't you just call him and 
		ask him? And m-maybe he'll say yes. 

				NEIL
		That's a laugh!

Neil tosses the blanket back onto his bed.

				NEIL
		If I don't ask him, at least I won't
		be disobeying him. 

				TODD
		Yeah, but if he said-- 

				NEIL
			   (shouting angrily)
		Jesus, Todd! Whose side are you on?

Todd says nothing. Neil looks at him for a moment and then takes
the flyer back from Todd. He walks over to the window, his 
excitement gone.

				NEIL
		I mean, I haven't even gotten the part 
		yet. Can't I even enjoy the idea for a 
		little while? 

Once again, Todd says nothing. After a moment, Neil sits on the
heater and Todd returns to his poem.

				NEIL
		You're coming to the meeting this 
		afternoon? 

				TODD
		I don't know. Maybe.

				NEIL
		Nothing Mr. Keating has to say means 
		shit to you, does it, Todd? 

				TODD
		W-What is that supposed to mean? 

				NEIL
		You're in the club! Being in the club 
		means being stirred up by things. You 
		look about as stirred up as a cesspool. 

Neil gets up from the window and stands over Todd.

				TODD
		So- You want me out? 

				NEIL
		No! I want you in, but being in means 
		you gotta do something. Not just say 
		you're in. 

				TODD
		Well, listen, Neil. I-I appreciate this 
		concern, but I-I'm not like you. All 
		right? You, you, you say thing and 
		people listen. I'm, I'm not like that. 

				NEIL
		Don't you think you could be? 

				TODD
		No! I--I, I don't know, but that's not 
		the point. The, the, the point is that 
		there's nothing you can do about it, so 
		you can just butt out. I can take care 
		of myself just fine. All right? 

				NEIL
		No. 

				TODD
		What do you mean, "no"? 

A smile comes to Neil's face.

				NEIL
		No. 

Neil grabs Todd's notebook of poetry and runs across the room with 
it. Todd leaps up after him.

				TODD
		Give me-- Neil. Neil, give that back. 

The two begin racing in circles around the room, jumping from
bed to bed as Todd tries to grab his poem back.

				NEIL
		"We are dreaming of a--" Poetry! I'm 
		being chased by Walt Whitman! Okay, 
		okay.

Neil drops the notebook. Cameron walks into the room.

				CAMERON
		What are you guys doing? I'm sure-- You 
		see this chemistry-

Cameron tries to hold up his book and Neil snatches it from his hands and
suddenly all three of them are racing around the room.

				CAMERON
		Hey, give me-- Neil, give me-- Don't be
		immature. Come on. I need my- 

Charlie enters the room and begins waving his hands.

				CHARLIE
		Give it to me! Give it to me! 

				NEIL
		Charlie!

Neil tosses Cameron's book to Charlie.

				CAMERON
		Let me have my book, I need my- 

The four boys continue racing around the cramped quarters, tossing
Cameron's book back and forth. Neil picks up a recorder and begins
blowing erratic notes on it while Charlie starts pounding on a set of
bongo drums. Outside the room a crowd of boys watch.

EXT. CAMPUS ENTRANCE - DAY

Knox is riding his bike around in circles near the entrance. Seeing no
one nearby, he races through the open gates and down the road. He comes
to the top of a hill and then goes downhill across the grass, shouting
as he sends an immense flock of geese flying into the air.

EXT. PARKING LOT - DAY

A number of vehicles drive up, filled with students dressed in bright red
cosyumes, playing trumpets and various other instruments as they pass.
Knox watches the growing crowd of students. They are all converging on
a bus. A football player, wearing a horned helmet, dances on the roof of
the bus. A band is playing while a group of cheerleaders are practising.
Knox spots Chris amongst the cheerleaders. He watches her until Chet
comes along and she grabs hold of his hand. Knox looks away in disgust.

				COACH
		Okay, everybody on the bus. Let's go, 
		boys. Come on, let's go. On the bus, 
		boys. Now!

Chris jumps into Chet's arms as everyone begins to board the buses. Knox
turns his bike around and leaves.

EXT. SOCCER FIELD - DAY

Keating walks across the field, followed by his students. He kicks a ball
ahead of him while he carries a number of other balls in a net slung over
his shoulder.

				KEATING
		Now, devotees may argue that one sport 
		or game is inherently better than 
		another. For me, sport is actually a 
		chance for us to have other human beings 
		push us to excel. I want you all to come 
		over here and take a slip of paper and 
		line up single file.

Keating reaches the stands. He tosses the balls aside and pulls sets
his briefcase down. As the boys line up he begins ripping off slips
of paper from a notepad and handing them out.

				KEATING
		Mr. Meeks, time to inherit the earth. 
		Mr. Pitts, rise above your name.

He hands the notepad to another student.

				KEATING
		I want you to hand these out to the boys,
		one apiece.

EXT. SOCCER FIELD - DAY

The students are all lined up in single file, each holding a slip
of paper. Keating blows his whistle.

				KEATING
		You know what to do, Pitts. 

				PITTS
		"Oh to struggle against great odds. To 
		meet enemies undaunted." 

				KEATING
		Sounds to me like you're daunted. Say it 
		again like you're undaunted. 

				PITTS
		"Oh to struggle against great odds. To 
		meet enemies undaunted." 

				KEATING
		Now go on.

Pitts gives one of the soccer balls a good kick.

				KEATING
		Yes! Next.

One of the students sets up the next ball as the line advances.

				BOY 1
		"To be a sailor of the world, bound for 
		all ports." 

				KEATING
		Next. Louder! 

				BOY 2
		"Oh, I live to be the ruler of life, not 
		a slave." 

Keating walks away and starts up a record player.

				BOY 3
		"To mount the scaffolds. To advance to 
		the muzzle of guns with perfect 
		nonchalance."

Classical music begins playing on the phonograph. Meeks goes to
read next but is confused by the music.

				KEATING
		Come on, Meeks! Listen to the music. 

				MEEKS
		"To dance, clap hands, exalt, shout, 
		skip, roll on, float on." 

				KEATING
		Yes! 

				HOPKINS
				(without energy)
		"Oh, to have life henceforth the poem of 
		new joys." 

Hopkins crumples up his paper and then barely taps the soccer
ball with his foot.

Keating puts a look of disgust on his face.

				KEATING
		Oh! Boo! Come on, Charlie, let it fill 
		your soul! 

Charlie raises his hands over his head.

				CHARLIE
		"To indeed be a god!" 

INT. DORM HALLWAY - DAY

Neil is racing down the hallway, all excited.

				NEIL
		Charlie, I got the part! I'm gonna play 
		Puck! I'm gonna play Puck!

He pounds on Charlie's door.

				MEEKS
		What did he say? 

				PITTS
		Puck? 

				NEIL
		That's the main part. 

				KNOX
		Great, Neil. 

				NEIL
		Charlie, I got it! 

				CHARLIE
		Congratulations. Good for you, Neil. 
		Good for you. 

Neil enters his room with Todd and sits down at his typewriter.

				NEIL
		Okay, okay, okay, okay. 

				TODD
		Neil, how are you gonna do this? 

				NEIL
		They need a letter of permission from my 
		father and Mr. Nolan. 

				TODD
		You're not gonna write it. 

				NEIL
		Oh yes, I am.